Author Topic: USA Homeless Report  (Read 765 times)

December 23, 2015, 09:51:12 PM
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Lz

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Money Free Party
Political Organization
The USA Money Free Party’s
assessment of
USA Housing The Homeless Cost Analysis
State to State
2015









Definition of Terms (*HUD)
 
Continuums of Care (CoC) are local planning bodies responsible for coordinating the full range of homelessness services in a geographic area, which may cover a city, county, metropolitan area, or an entire state.
Chronically Homeless People in Families are people experiencing homelessness in families in which the head of household has a disability and has either been continuously homeless for a year or more or has experienced at least four episodes of homelessness in the last three years.
Chronically Homeless Individuals are unaccompanied homeless individuals with disabilities who have either been continuously homeless for a year or more or have experienced at least four episodes of homelessness in the last three years.
Emergency Shelter is a facility with the primary purpose of providing temporary shelter for homeless people.
Individuals are people who are not part of a family during their episode of homelessness. They are homeless as single adults, unaccompanied youth, or in multiple-adult or multiple-child households.
Other Permanent Housing is housing with or without services that is specifically for formerly homeless people, but that does not require people to have a disability.
Rapid Rehousing is a housing model designed to provide temporary housing assistance to people experiencing homelessness, moving them quickly out of homelessness and into permanent housing.
Permanent Supportive Housing is designed to provide housing and supportive services on a long-term basis for formerly homeless people, who have disabilities.
People in Families are people who are homeless as part of households that have at least one adult and one child.
Point-in-Time Counts are unduplicated one-night estimates of both sheltered and unsheltered homeless populations. The one-night counts are conducted by Continuums of Care nationwide and occur during the last week in January of each year.
Safe Havens provide private or semi-private long-term housing for people with severe mental illness and are limited to serving no more than 25 people within a facility.
Sheltered Homeless People are individuals who are staying in emergency shelters, transitional housing programs, or safe havens.
Transitional Housing Program provides homeless people a place to stay combined with supportive services for up to 24 months in order to help them overcome barriers to moving into and retaining permanent housing.
Unaccompanied Children are people who are not part of a family or in a multi-child household during their episode of homelessness, and who are under the age of 18.
Unaccompanied Youth are people who are
not part of a family during their episode of homelessness and who are between the ages of 18 and 24.
Unsheltered Homeless People are people who stay in places not meant for human habitation, such as the streets, abandoned buildings, vehicles, or parks.
 
About This Report
The Money free Party has done an analysis of the cost of the chronically homeless to the State hence the American tax payer. Comparing the cost if left as they are on the streets verses placed in a permanent housing first program with an assigned social worker.
Through journalistic review and various state reports the MFP has concluded that on average, using modest averages of the calculations made by said reports that to permanently house the chronically homeless, including a social worker would cost the State approximately 1/3rd as much money as it does to do nothing and simply leave the homeless to fend for themselves. This is due to the high incidence of police interaction and overnight jail time as well as hypothermia and other illness requiring emergency visits to the hospital as well as high cost overnight hospital stays, all at a cost to the state.
Approximate Cost of homelessness to state 

We have found the costs of homelessness to vary from $30,000 - $150,000 annually per person, per state.
I am calculating with the lowest rounded cost amount per person, the same
across each state, with the estimated amount of people homeless in each state, to come up with an average annual cost of homelessness to each state. 

I am then calculating the potential savings to each state with the estimated permanent housing cost of $10,000, Per person indicative to the $30,000 cost scenario done in the Florida report.

Research has not been done as to the specifics of these costs per state. The savings indicated here is an estimated savings per state to permanently house their chronically homeless. Using the low end statistics found in these categories. 

State numbers sourced - 2014 HUD statistics for number of homeless per state 

State by State approximate cost/savings averaged


Washington – 
2,311 homeless.  
Annual cost - $69,330,000.  
Permanent housing cost - $23,110,000.  
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless - $46,220,000.

Oregon –
2,207 homeless.
Annual cost – $66,210,000.
Permanent housing cost – $22,070,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $44,140,000.

California-
28,200 homeless.
Annual cost – $846,000,000.
Permanent housing cost – $282,000,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $564,000,000.

Arizona –
904 homeless.
Annual cost – $27,120,000.
Permanent housing cost – $9,040,000. 
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $18,080,000.

Indiana -
156 homeless.
Annual cost – $4,680,000.
Permanent housing cost – $1,560,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $3,120,000.




Nevada –
999 homeless.
Annual cost – 29,970,000. 
Permanent housing cost –9,990,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $19,980,000.

Utah –
386 homeless.
Annual cost – $11,580,000.
Permanent housing cost – $3,860,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $7,720,000.

Montana –
256 homeless.
Annual cost – $7,680,000. 
Permanent housing cost – $2,560,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless –$5,120,000.

Wyoming -
105 homeless.
Annual cost – $3,150,000.
Permanent housing cost – $1,050,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $2,100,000.

Colorado – 
1,335 homeless.
Annual cost – $40,050,000.
Permanent housing cost – $13,350,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $26,700,000.

New Mexico –
617 homeless.
Annual cost – $18,510,000.
Permanent housing cost – $6,170,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless –$12,340,000.


North Dakota –
111 homeless.
Annual cost – $3,330,000.
Permanent housing cost – $1,110,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $2,220,000.

South Dakota –
81 homeless.
Annual cost – $2,430,000.
Permanent housing cost – $810,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $1,620,000.

Nebraska –
365 homeless.
Annual cost –  $10,950,000.
Permanent housing cost – $3,650,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $7,300,000.

Kansas –
290 homeless.
Annual cost – $8,700,000.
Permanent housing cost – $2,900,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $5,800,000.

Oklahoma – 
585 homeless.
Annual cost –  $17,550,000.
Permanent housing cost – $5,850,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $11,700,000.

Texas- 
4,952 homeless.
Annual cost –  One $148,560,000.
Permanent housing cost – $49,520,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $99,040,000.


Minnesota –
885 homeless.
Annual cost – $26,550,000.
Permanent housing cost – $8,850,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $17,700,000.

Iowa –
211 homeless.
Annual cost – $6,330,000.
Permanent housing cost – $2,110,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $4,220,000.

Missouri –
735 homeless.
Annual cost – $22,050,000.
Permanent housing cost – $7,350,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $14,700,000.

Arkansas –
516 homeless.
Annual cost – $15,480,000.
Permanent housing cost – $5,160,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $10,320,000.

Louisiana –
743 homeless.
Annual cost – $22,290,000.
Permanent housing cost – $7,430,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $14,860,000.

Wisconsin –
436 homeless.
Annual cost –  $13,080,000.
Permanent housing cost – $4,360,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $8,720,000.


Illinois –
1,349 homeless.
Annual cost – $40,470,000.
Permanent housing cost – $13,490,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $26,980,000.

Kentucky -
614 homeless.
Annual cost – $18,420,000.
Permanent housing cost – $6,140,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $12,280,000.

Tennessee –
1,904 homeless.
Annual cost – $57,120,000.
Permanent housing cost – $19,040,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $38,080,000.

Mississippi –
275 homeless.
Annual cost – $8,250,000.
Permanent housing cost – $2,750,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $5,500,000.

Michigan –
1,160 homeless.
Annual cost – $34,800,000.
Permanent housing cost – $11,600,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $23,200,000.

Indiana –
542 homeless.
Annual cost – $16,260,000.
Permanent housing cost – $5,420,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $10,840,000.


Alabama –
618 homeless.
Annual cost – $18,540,000.
Permanent housing cost – $6,180,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $12,360,000.

Ohio -
1,340 homeless.
Annual cost – $40,200,000.
Permanent housing cost – $13,400,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $26,800,000.

Maine –
218 homeless.
Annual cost – $6,540,000.
Permanent housing cost – $2,180,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $4,360,000.

Vermont –
199 homeless.
Annual cost – $5,970,000.
Permanent housing cost – $1,990,000. 
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $3,980,000.

New Hampshire –
301 homeless.
Annual cost – $9,030,000.
Permanent housing cost – $3,010,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $6,020,000.

Massachusetts –
1,590 homeless.
Annual cost – $47,700,000..
Permanent housing cost – $15,900,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $31,800,000.


Rhode Island –
204 homeless.
Annual cost – $6,120,000.
Permanent housing cost – $2,040,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $4,080,000.

Connecticut –
1,026 homeless.
Annual cost – $30,780,000.
Permanent housing cost – $10,260,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $20,520,000.

New Jersey –
1,150 homeless.
Annual cost – $34,500,000.
Permanent housing cost – $10,500,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless –
$24,000,000.

New York – 
4,350 homeless.  
Annual cost - $130,500,000.  
Permanent housing cost - $43,500,000.  
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless - $87,000,000.

Delaware –
88 homeless.
Annual cost – $2,640,000. 
Permanent housing cost – $880,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $1,760,000.

Maryland –
1,515 homeless.
Annual cost – $45,450,000.
Permanent housing cost – $15,150,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $30,300,000.


Washington DC –
1,609 homeless.
Annual cost – $48,270,000.
Permanent housing cost – $16,090,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $32,180,000.

West Virginia –
424 homeless.
Annual cost – $12,720,000.
Permanent housing cost – $4,240,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $8,480,000.

Virginia –
965 homeless.
Annual cost – $28,950,000.
Permanent housing cost – $9,650,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $19,300,000.

North Carolina –
1,284 homeless.
Annual cost – $38,520,000.
Permanent housing cost – $12,840,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless –
$25,680,000.

South Carolina –
273 homeless.
Annual cost – $8,190,000.
Permanent housing cost – $2,730,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless –  $5,460,000. 

Georgia –
2,645 homeless.
Annual cost – $79,350,000.
Permanent housing cost – $26,450,000..
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $52,900,000.


Florida -
6,843 homeless.
Annual cost – $205,290,000.
Permanent housing cost – $68,430,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $136,860,000.

Hawaii –
1,109 homeless.
Annual cost – $33,270,000.
Permanent housing cost – $11,090,000.
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $22,180,000.

Alaska –
182 homeless.
Annual cost – $5,460,000.
Permanent housing cost – $1,820,000. 
Annual savings to state to permanently house the chronic homeless – $3,640,000. 



References
https://www..hudexchange.info/resources/documents/2014-AHAR-Part1.pdf

http://www.endhomelessness.org/library/entry/chronic-homelessness-policy-solutions

http://www.coalitionforthehomeless.org/state-of-the-homeless-2014/

http://www.politifact..com/truth-o-meter/statements/2012/mar/12/shaun-donovan/hud-secretary-says-homeless-person-costs-taxpayers/

http://www.greendoors..org/facts/cost.php

http://www.endhomelessness.org/pages/cost_of_homelessness

http://m.dailykos.com/story/2015/02/09/1363333/-Housing-the-homeless-costs-less-than-a-leaving-them-on-the-streets-a-lot-less

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/09/22/home-free






December 24, 2015, 08:37:23 AM
Reply #1

Andrei Dudau

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